Book your school tour at
Toll Free: 1-877-287-4752
Local: 705-945-6242
Email: Donna Barill
Our Grade Six Program focuses on the understanding the structures and mechanisms of flight. Students will have a chance to climb inside, play, touch and even "fly" with their classmates in an old Saunders passenger aircraft. Students will also discover how bushplanes help fight forest fires and will get a chance to climb a fire tower to put out a forest fire on their own. We will ignite your student's imaginations and interest. Your class will learn quickly that adventure takes off at the Canadian Bushplane Heritage Centre!

Big Idea: Flight occurs when the characteristics of structures take advantage of certain properties of air.

Overall Expectation: Assess the societal and environmental impacts of flying devices that make use of properties of air.
Specific Expectation: Assess the benefits and costs of aviation technology for society and the environment, taking different social and economic perspectives into account.
How: Our experts will guide the students through a memorable experience of the Canadian Bushplane Heritage Centre. The students will discover the forces that allow an aircraft to fly as well as how the bushplane has evolved and adapted to meet the needs of the environment, the pilots and the passengers. We will also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of bushplanes.

Big Idea: Flight occurs when the characteristics of structures take advantage of certain properties of air.

Overall Expectation: Investigate ways in which flying devices make use of properties of air.
Specific Expectation: Follow established safety procedures for using tools and materials and operating flying devices.
How: The tour guide will explain and enforce the rules of the CBHC to all students before they enter the centre.

Big Idea: Flight occurs when the characteristics of structures take advantage of certain properties of air.

Overall Expectation: Investigate ways in which flying devices make use of properties of air.
Specific Expectation: Use scientific inquiry/experimentation skills to investigate the properties of air.
How: Students will have fun while learning in our Children's Flight Centre this includes flight simulators, arcade-style gaming consoles, displays on the properties of air and flight and students can also sit in a real aircraft cockpit.

Big Idea: Flight occurs when the characteristics of structures take advantage of certain properties of air.

Overall Expectation: Investigate ways in which flying devices make use of properties of air.
Specific Expectation: Use technological problem-solving skills to design, build and test a flying device.
How: In the post tour lesson that is provided students will test different paper plane designs to see which folding techniques work the best. They will create their design keeping in mind the principles of flight that they have learned during their time at the Canadian Bushplane Heritage Centre.

Big Idea: Flight occurs when the characteristics of structures take advantage of certain properties of air.

Overall Expectation: Investigate ways in which flying devices make use of properties of air;
Specific Expectation: Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including aerodynamics, flight, glide, propel, drag, thrust and lift, in oral and written communication.
How: We create an environment where students experience new terminology and where they see things they have never seen before. Our expert guides allow and encourage questioning while students discover all of this new and exciting information.

Big Idea: Air has many properties that can be used for flight and for other purposes.

Overall Expectation: Explain ways in which properties of air can be applied to the principles of flight and flying devices.
Specific Expectation: Identify the properties of air that make flight possible.
How: A mini lesson on flight will be given before the students observe the exhibits. The mini lesson will touch on thrust vs. drag and lift vs. gravity, the nature of air, wings, stabilizers, fin, aileron, elevator, rudder, wingspan, range and ceiling. Students will have fun while learning in our Children's Flight Centre, this area includes flight simulators, arcade-style gaming consoles, displays on the properties of air and flight and students can also sit in a real aircraft cockpit.

Big Idea: Air has many properties that can be used for flight and for other purposes.

Overall Expectation: Explain ways in which properties of air can be applied to the principles of flight and flying devices.
Specific Expectation: Identify and describe the four forces of flight - lift, weight, drag and thrust.
How: A mini lesson on flight will be given before the students observe the bushplanes it will touch on thrust vs. drag and lift vs. gravity, the nature of air, wings, stabilizers, fin, aileron, elevator, rudder, wingspan, range, ceiling as well as the Newtonian Effect and the Bernoulli Principle.

Big Idea: Air has many properties that can be used for flight and for other purposes.

Overall Expectation: Explain ways in which properties of air can be applied to the principles of flight and flying devices.
Specific Expectation: Describe, in qualitative terms, the relationships between the forces of lift, weight, thrust and drag that are required for flight.
How: A mini lesson on flight will be given before the students observe the bushplanes it will touch on thrust vs. drag and lift vs. gravity, the nature of air, wings, stabilizers, fin, aileron, elevator, rudder, wingspan, range, ceiling as well as the Newtonian Effect and the Bernoulli Principle.

Big Idea: Air has many properties that can be used for flight and for other purposes.

Overall Expectation: Explain ways in which properties of air can be applied to the principles of flight and flying devices.
Specific Expectation: Describe ways in which flying devices or living things use unbalanced forces to control their flight.
How: A mini lesson on flight will be given before the students observe the bushplanes it will touch on thrust vs. drag and lift vs. gravity, the nature of air, wings, stabilizers, fin, aileron, elevator, rudder, wingspan, range, ceiling as well as the Newtonian Effect and the Bernoulli Principle.

Big Idea: Air has many properties that can be used for flight and for other purposes.

Overall Expectation: Explain ways in which properties of air can be applied to the principles of flight and flying devices.
Specific Expectation: Describe ways in which the four forces of flight can be altered.
How: A mini lesson on flight will be given before the students observe the bushplanes it will touch on thrust vs. drag and lift vs. gravity, the nature of air, wings, stabilizers, fin, aileron, elevator, rudder, wingspan, range, ceiling as well as the Newtonian Effect and the Bernoulli Principle.

Museum Tour

  1. Brief presentation on the Bushplane Heritage Centre
  2. Chalk Talk
  3. Hangar Tour
  4. Wings Over the North Object Theatre or Bush Angels
  5. Flight Centre & Fire Tower
  6. Depart Facility after 2 Hour Tour

Lessons

Associated lessons are encouraged before and the field trip. Many students may not have been to a museum and it is helpful to establish the rules of a museum as well as get them excited to come and experience all the fun adventures they are about to have. The following activities are all optional; our tours are developed to be stand-alone and pre or post lessons are not required to experience a field trip at the Canadian Bushplane Heritage Centre.
You can use one lesson or a combination of lessons to aid your students in their experience. All the resources for the activities are supplied and most of the suggested books may be lent out through our own library for up to one week. Some books are also noted to be in the Public Library for teachers to take out for longer periods of time.

Lesson 1

Students Will Discover:

  • What factors affect how well an aircraft will fly.
The entire lesson along along with support material is included in the Teachers Package

Lesson 2

Students Will Discover:

  • An increased speed of airflow over a surface results in a decrease in air pressure over that surface.
  • Air moves faster over a cambered or arched, surface than over a flat surface.
  • Together, these two facts explain how an aircraft lifts into the air and stays in the air.
The entire lesson along along with support material is included in the Teachers Package

Suggested Reading:

Fast & Fun Paper Planes,

Paul Jackson
Sterling Publishing Co., Inc., 2004.

The Kid's Guide to Paper Planes,

Christopher L. Harbo
Capstone Press, 2009.

Super Paper Planes: Biplanes to Space Planes

Norman Schmidt
Sterling Publishing Co., Inc., 1995.

The Magic School Bus Taking Flight: A Book about Flight

Joanna Cole
Scholastic Inc., 1997.

The Magic School Bus "Taking Flight" DVD,

Kermit Frazier and George Arthur Bloom
Warner Home Video, November 4, 1995.

The Science of Air: Projects and Experiments with Air and Flight

Steve Parker
. Heinemann Library, 2005.
You may speak to someone for more information or to book your school tour at
Toll Free: 1-877-287-4752
Local: 705-945-6242
Email: Donna Barill
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